ARCHIVE: Soyinka and the legacy of cultism in Nigerian universities and on Nigerian streets killing millions

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Wole Soyinka, the first Nigerian Nobel laureate, is a prominent figure in African literature and culture.

His controversial status is partly due to his role in the establishment of the Pyrates Confraternity (also known as the Seadogs), a clandestine society formed at the University of Ibadan in 1952 that have killed millions of Nigerians and counting.

The Pyrates Confraternity

The Pyrates Confraternity was originally a literary and social club, but it soon evolved into a more militant organization. Some members of the confraternity began to engage in violence and intimidation, and they were eventually banned from universities in Nigeria.

Soyinka has distanced himself from the Pyrates Confraternity in recent years, but his involvement in its founding has led some to argue that he bears some responsibility for the legacy of cultism in Nigerian universities.

The problem of Cultism in Nigerian university

Cultism in Nigerian universities is a serious problem. Cult members engage in a wide range of criminal activities, including extortion, violence, and murder. They have also been known to disrupt academic activities and intimidate students.

The legacy of cultism in Nigerian universities is complex. It is clear that the Pyrates Confraternity played a role in its development, but there are other factors that have contributed to the problem. These include the lack of security on university campuses, the erosion of academic values, and the social and economic problems facing Nigeria as a whole.

Cultism on the street

Cultism has also spread to Nigerian streets. Cult members engage in criminal activities such as robbery, kidnapping, and drug trafficking. They have also been involved in political violence and election rigging.

The legacy of cultism in Nigeria is a serious problem that has had a devastating impact on the country. It has led to the deaths of many innocent people, and it has created a climate of fear and insecurity.

Soyinka’s views on cultism

Soyinka has spoken out against cultism on numerous occasions. He has condemned the violence and intimidation that cult members engage in, and he has called for the government to take action to address the problem.

In a 2017 interview, Soyinka said that cultism is “a cancer that is eating away at the fabric of Nigerian society.” He called for the government to “declare a state of emergency” on cultism and to crack down on cult members.

Soyinka has also criticized the role that some university administrators have played in enabling cultism. He has accused them of turning a blind eye to the problem and of even collaborating with cult members.

The challenges of addressing cultism

Addressing the legacy of cultism in Nigeria is a complex challenge. There are a number of factors that need to be addressed, including:

Security: University campuses need to be more secure, and the police need to be better equipped to deal with cult-related crime.

Academic values: The erosion of academic values needs to be reversed. Students need to be taught the importance of critical thinking and independent thought.

Social and economic problems: The social and economic problems facing Nigeria as a whole need to be addressed. This will help to reduce the appeal of cultism to young people.

Conclusion

Wole Soyinka’s involvement in the founding of the Pyrates Confraternity has led some to argue that he bears some responsibility for the legacy of cultism in Nigerian universities. However, it is important to note that Soyinka has distanced himself from the confraternity in recent years, and he has spoken out against cultism on numerous occasions.

The legacy of cultism in Nigeria is a serious problem that has had a devastating impact on the country. It is a complex challenge that will require a concerted effort from all stakeholders to address.

In addition to the challenges mentioned above, it is also important to address the root causes of cultism, such as peer pressure, parental neglect, and societal problems such as poverty and inequality.

It is also important to educate young people about the dangers of cultism and to provide them with alternative pathways to success.

By addressing the root causes of cultism and providing young people with alternative pathways, Nigeria can begin to break the cycle of violence and intimidation that has plagued the country for so long.

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